Email to my sister

In the score one for madness column, this email to my sister:

I know the “review” of Tekserve is too long.  Brings to mind the famous Mark Twain apology for the long letter (sorry, I didn’t have time to make it shorter)… I have to just be done with it and get to the next task.   Each of these tasks contains some measure of frustration— which makes the entire menu a bit unappetizing.  
 
I figure if someone goes on Yelp to check reviews of Tekserve, sees zero stars and the first paragraph, fine, my job is done.   If you want more details, click “read more” and get the whole ugly story, see if I’m just being a pissy crybaby or not.   The guy who owns the company will get the whole thing emailed to him, the long, detailed YELP.  Done.  I don’t expect the prick to do anything to change anything anyway.  
What could he do at this point to make it right that his store dicked me around for a total of over 9 hours of wasted time for me (days after I dropped $2,500 there)?  And glared at me and told me silently to go fuck myself at the end?  A guy who runs a store with a culture like that is unlikely to do anything in any case, and fuck him anyway.  You know what I’m sayin’?
 
Spent 28 minutes on the phone with Columbia Doctors this afternoon, two different Patient Services numbers, both insist the $507 for the 20 minute meeting with the useless PA is what MY insurance company agreed I have to pay.  Take it up with insurance, with my senator, with The United Nations.
 
Fit to be tied, then, work keeps getting complicated with new learning curves on the new macBook, plenty of frustrations with the enormous changes they’ve made in the new operating system to all the programs the kids use.  If I brought this new macBook into a classroom, though its 4 times more powerful than the one we use now,  I couldn’t run the workshop with it.  The geniuses at Apple have finally defeated my child-friendly design for a student-run production studio with radical “improvements” to make the macBook more closely resemble an iPhone or other IOS device.  
 
Being right, having an innovative program that could help many kids, being subjected to unfairness nobody should have to put up with, none of it means anything in our corporations-are-people-too society.  Listen to Obama talk to Marc Maron on WTF– the coolest, most relaxed, reasonable guy in the world, certainly the coolest president.   Look at the details of many of the things Oybama’s doing — hoy boy, Cheney would be smiling– if only Obama wasn’t a… you know.  
 
Obamacare, his signature achievement:  Is it better that pre-existing conditions are gone, that millions more are insured, that fewer Americans will die unnecessarily every year to preserve the obscene profits of the American health care industry?   Absolutely.  Isn’t it progress?  OK, it’s a step in the right direction.  Is it perfect?  He readily admits it’s not– now we have to fix it– without unfairly upsetting the profit expectations of those private corporations who expect to keep making billions.  That this corporate calculus, admittedly (though you’ll never hear him say it) necessitates fucking a certain number of Americans, hopefully only a few million… well, that’s unfortunate for the people affected, although millions of others are still far better off than before.  Let’s not talk about the millions of Americans still not covered, OK?  Don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.
 
As he talks about all the progress we’ve made, his administration has made, I kept thinking of the children of recently freed slaves, born in 1868, free blacks under the amended US Constitution.   Was it better to be born free than a slave?  Absolutely.  Was Jim Crow and lynching and Black Codes for 100 years bad?  And the Supreme Court continuing to rule, until 1954, that all this was perfectly legal under the Constitution?   Yes, it was very bad.   But, on the other hand, if that baby born in 1868 lived to be 147 years old he’d get to see a day when people started realizing that flying a Confederate battle flag over a U.S. government building is the same as flying a swastika flag over a German government building.   And we don’t publicly use that terrible word anymore, we say “the n-word”, right?  And the son of an African man and a white woman as president?  See, that’s progress?  No?   You can’t say it’s not, can you?
 
After today’s rant about Obamacare Sekhnet told me, once more, to write an editorial for the NY Times on the theme of  “Don’t take it personally”.   Systemically Obamacare is an improvement over what existed before, the elimination of the grotesque loophole of “pre-existing condition” alone was worth the fight, giving the medical industry financial incentives to prevent disease rather than profiting off billions in late in the game testing and treatment, also, good idea.  Millions more Americans have health care, many for free, and if you find yourself among a few million who are fucked by the details of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, feel unprotected and that the care you are mandated to buy is not affordable, you must realize that it’s nothing personal.  Yes, it’s your problem, true, but take courage in knowing that you are not alone in being fucked by this wonderful program.  It’s nothing personal.
Look at it this way: would you rather be fucked with the right to be hospitalized (at no expense beyond your premiums and deductibles) when you finally have a stroke or without that right?  Hmmmm?   Think about it.
 
Got to somehow finish the 90% done marketing stuff relating to my program, though it feels impossible to gracefully dance off that last 10% in the current mood I’m in.  
“Success is the ability to go from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm,” said Winston Churchill, getting drunk as a skunk and sleeping til noon.  “But the question is– what does it take to remain encouraged?”
I’d go out and walk a couple of miles, keep my streak going, but there’s a thunderstorm pissing down at the moment.
 
Wee wee wee!
Biting my own foot off,
Nnnnnngggggg
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